Friday, June 14, 2024
WebStore.pk Banner
HomeHardwareAudio & VideoNew Invention: Petabyte-Scale Optical Disc Holds Data of 15,000 DVDs.

New Invention: Petabyte-Scale Optical Disc Holds Data of 15,000 DVDs.

Researchers have created a novel optical disc type that can boost data storage capacity to the “petabit” level, which is equivalent to 125 terabytes, or almost 15,000 DVDs’ worth of combined storage.

Optical discs, like Blu-ray and DVD discs, are affordable and long-lasting. A typical Blu-ray disk with one layer has a capacity of 25 gigabytes. Hard disk drives (HDDs) can store up to 16 TB, while some USB flash drives have a 1 TB capacity.

However, a group of researchers has developed a novel material known as “dye-doped photoresist with aggregation-induced emission luminogens” (AIE-DDPR), which can provide significantly denser storage capacity than conventional HDDs and has a high areal density (the amount of data that can be stored in a given area).

With the quantity of data we create every day growing—from instant messaging to streaming videos—AIE-DDPR optical discs could completely change the way data is stored. Optical discs are more ecologically friendly, need less space than other storage options, and may eventually be less expensive than data storage arrays.

AIE-DDPR uses two substances, 2-isopropylthioxanthone and dipentaerythritol penta-acrylate, to enable nanoscale writing, which is the molecule-level recording of information on an optical disk. ITX exhibits photoinitiation efficiency as it responds to light, even laser light. DTPA is a monomer, a tiny molecule that reacts strongly to light due to its great photosensitivity. Together, the two essentially make it possible to store more data densely than ever before.

Hexaphenylsilole (HPS) and a novel substance known as AIE luminogens (AIEgens) were added to the film for nanoscale reading. A highly focused laser beam blasted in bursts lasting a femtosecond (one-millionth of one-billionth of a second) during the writing process, enhancing the already extremely high fluorescence (high absorption rate of electromagnetic radiation) of amines. As a result, information may be stored on an optical disk much more densely.

To boost the disc’s storage density, the researchers employed multilayer nanoscale writing and reading, which stores data in several layers at the molecular level. One thousandth of a millimeter, or one micrometer, is the spacing between layers that the study team used to store and retrieve 100 layers of data. By storing data on both sides of the disk, akin to a vinyl record, the storage capacity was further increased.

The researchers used multilayer nanoscale writing to store over one petabit of data on a single AIE-DDPR disc. This is more than five thousand Blu-ray discs could hold.

The writing speed will need to be increased and made more energy-efficient in order to be economically feasible. By employing a laser beam that is significantly more precise than the one used in the experiment, the team expects to achieve this goal.

With the quantity of data we create every day growing—from instant messaging to streaming videos—AIE-DDPR optical discs could completely change the way data is stored. Optical discs are less expensive than data storage arrays and require less space than other storage solutions.

RELATED ARTICLES

Most Popular

Recent Comments